The Briefly for May 1, 2020 – The "Are We The City That Sleeps Now?" Edition

Today - Low: 51˚ High: 62˚

Rain until evening.

This weekend - Low: 56˚ High: 73˚

The story behind Frank Sinatra's version of "New York, New York," how it saved his career, and how it almost never happened. I still maintain that the Sinatra version should only be played at Yankee Stadium when the Yankees win. (Michael Wilson for NY Times) There has never been a better time to go vegetarian, as New York City may be looking at a possible meat shortage. Even the idea of a meat shortage may lead to one, as people will begin to overbuy meat. (Ron Lee for NY1) The subways will shut down between 1 am and 5 am every day so every subway car can be disinfected. Buses will continue to run. Overnight service will be back when "customer demand returns." (Kathleen Culliton for Patch) If it seems stupid to close a 1,000-acre national recreation area from the public in order to park 100 MTA buses, you're right. The Gateway National Recreation Area is working to allow members of the Floyd Bennett Gardens Association access to their gardens, but the mayor is one of the voices calling for the reopening of the former airfield. (Jose Martinez and Gabriel Sandoval for The City) 11 excellent burgers, available for takeout or delivery. (Carla Vianna for Eater) The City Council approved the conversion of a former Jehovah’s Witness hotel into a 500-unit affordable housing complex in DUMBO. (Sebastian Morris for New York YIMBY) A little bit more on the bodies found in a truck outside a Flatlands funeral home. A 911 caller reported they were seeing “blood coming from one of the trucks.” The NYPD said the 15 bodies had been in the non-refrigerated truck for over a week, but no crimes had been committed. (Todd Maisel for Brooklyn Paper) The Pegu Club in Soho, regarded as "one of the best bars ever" by Grub Street, is closing for good. Their lease was up in October, but they couldn't make it through the temporary closure during the pandemic. (Alan Sytsma for Grub Street) Cocktail hour, which could be any hour as time has lost all meaning, is back. (Gina Bellafante for NY Times) 21 top-notch Thai restaurants still open in NYC. (Dan Q. Dao for Eater) The Bronx has its first Krispy Kreme. At this point, who doesn't need a load of sugar? (Ed García Conde for Welcome2TheBronx) A look inside the New York City Archaeological Repository for the city's earliest pottery. A wild thought for a city that considers an alley where The Ramones once hung out in the 70s a piece of history. (Justin W. Thomas for Untapped New York) NY Attorney General Letitia James is calling on cable companies to provide financial relief to consumers until live sports programming is resumed. (Jen Chung for Gothamist) The mayor says the NYPD will enforce social distancing, and this time he means it, even if he's said this multiple times now. (Kathleen Culliton for Patch) The story of Colleen and Ian Bock and the Acre, the restaurant in Ridgewood she was almost ready to open right when everything went to hell. (Chris Crowley for Grub Street) Advocates are hoping to see one million New Yorkers participate in today's rent strike, hoping to put pressure on the governor to take immediate action for rent relief and prevent evictions down the line. (Davin Gannon for 6sqt) The city is distributing 100,000 free face coverings in parks across all five boroughs, starting as early as this weekend. (Collier Sutter for Time Out) Disability Rights New York is suing the governor for not including an American Sign Language interpreter at his daily press conferences. The governor's office responded that ASL versions of the daily press conferences are available on the web. (Marina Fang for HuffPost) The city's Small Business Services has issued $8 million in loans to small businesses but is disproportionately providing 66% of the available loans to Manhattan businesses. Businesses in the Bronx have received $80,000 in loans, only 1%, but has seen 23% of the city's positive COVID-19 tests. (David Cruz for Gothamist) If you have a car that you haven't used in a while, maybe it's time to check the engine for rat colony. (Caity Weaver for NY Times) Farewell to the USNS Comfort, which treated 182 COVID-19 patients while it was in New York. (Charles Woodman for Patch) IKEA is working with the Queens Borough Presidents's office to donate about 14,000 products to Queens-based non-profits and shelters. (Michael Gordan for Queens Post) School food service employees, who are doing the work to distribute millions of meals to NYC, say they’re not adequately protected or acknowledged for their exposure to the public. (Sophia Chang for Gothamist) An Illinois woman was arrested in Manhattan carrying 18 knives and other weapons in her vehicle after she allegedly threatened Joe Biden, and Hillary Clinton. Jessica Prim, who goes by Kimita Steel online, was broadcasting on Facebook Live when she was arrested by the Secret Service, spouting QAnon bullshit conspiracy theories and headed towards the USNS Comfort. (Ben Yakas for Gothamist) "I am eligible," declares a governor to all Cuomosexuals. (Kathleen Culliton for Patch) A deep and leveled look at what makes it so difficult for the city's messaging about staying safe and social distancing to penetrate the Hasidic and Ultra-Orthodox communities and why de Blasio's singling them out publicly in the manner that he did only stands to make the problem worse. (Elad Nehorai for HuffPost) The photographers who are capturing an empty New York City, creating a powerful and eerie set of images we never thought we'd see. (Howard Halle for Time Out) Are you one of the New Yorkers re-creating famous book covers inside your home? (Shaye Weaver for Time Out) Where to get affordable takeout. (Nikko Duren for The Infatuation) Thanks to reader Arden for today's featured photo!