The Briefly for June 18, 2020 – The "One Billion Dollars in Cuts" Edition

Today - Low: 66˚ High: 73˚

Mostly cloudy throughout the day.

Governor Cuomo says the city can start phase 2 of reopening on Monday. (Jen Carlson for Gothamist) This is the last year that Juneteenth will not be a New York State holiday. State employees will get Juneteenth as a holiday via executive order and Governor Cuomo said he'll introduce legislation to recognize Juneteenth as a state holiday for 2021. (Devin Gannon for 6sqft) The City's guide to the June 23 primaries. (Christine Chung for The City) Video: The Democratic primary debate between Suraj Patel, Lauren Ashcraft, Peter Harrison, and Rep. Carolyn Maloney to represent portions of Manhattan, Brooklyn, and Queens. (Emily Ngo, primary moderated by Errol Lewis for NY1) Planned Parenthood hasn't made an endorsement in the 15th Congressional District Democratic primary, but they have come out in opposition of City Councilmember Rubén Díaz Sr. in a new set of ads, highlighting his anti-abortion and homophobic comments from his past. (Emily Ngo for NY1) Senator Chuck Schumer endorsed Rep. Eliot Engel as the Democratic establishment has lined up behind Engle, who recently said "If I didn't have a primary, I wouldn't care" about the George Floyd protests around the city. (Marianne LeVine for Politico) Cutting overtime, not replacing 2,300 retiring cops, replacing school cops with safety agents, and more. A look at the City Council's proposed $1 billion in cuts to the NYPD's budget. (Sally Goldenberg and Joe Anuta for Politico) “As I’m standing there with my riot helmet and being called a ‘coon,’ people have no idea that I identify with them. I understand them. I’m here for them. I’ve been trying to be here as a change agent.” -Black NYPD officers sound off on how they feel about the George Floyd Protesters. (Ashley Southall and Edgar Sandoval for NY Times) "Where was the good cop to help me?" -Dounya Zayer, the woman shoved to the street by a cop, who suffers from a concussion, seizures, nausea, insomnia, and migraines as a result. Through the testimony during NY Attorney General's first day of hearing about the NYPD's actions during George Floyd protests, James attempted to make the case that there are "good cops" in the NYPD, despite none of them stepping up to actually protect and serve the people of the city. (Kathleen Culliton for Patch) The NYPD's disciplinary records will soon be available in an online database, according to Mayor de Blasio. The NYPD will also be required to publish all internal trial decisions and information for all pending cases. There is no deadline for these measures and no known punishment if they aren't followed. (Ben Verde for Brooklyn Paper) What the hell is the NYPD doing by barricading off sections of Carl Schulz Park near the NYC Ferry docks? They are "protecting" Gracie Mansion from "protesters," who have rarely ever used the park as a place to protest. The NYPD is selectively allowing people through, which you should read as "letting white people through." While park space is at a premium, this is despicable. (Steven Yago for Streetsblog) There are several additional blocks in the city that are blocked off that aren't on the list of Open Streets. They are streets that the NYPD has illegally blocked off streets outside their precincts. The NYPD nor Mayor de Blasio have anything to say about this. (Jake Offenhartz for Gothamist) A Brooklyn man plans to sue the NYPD after an officer tackled him during a barbecue on Memorial Day in Crown Heights, causing burns from hot coals and scrapes, according to a notice of claim filed by his lawyer. (Sydney Pereira for Gothamist) A class-action lawsuit was filed against the City of New York, NYPD Commissioner Dermot Shea, and a series of individual police officers for allegedly violating a bail reform law by allegedly wrongfully detaining New Yorkers following a DUI. (Noah Singer for Brooklyn Eagle) Without tourists or office workers, Times Square is a ghost town. Thousands of New Yorkers sleeping in shelters face a disproportionately high mortality rate during the pandemic, according to a Coalition for the Homeless report. (Valeria Ricciulli for Curbed) The Bowery Residents' Committee's work to get homeless New Yorkers on the subways into shelters has been questionable at best. A recent report from the MTA Inspector General notes they are "very expensive" while having "minimal effectiveness." Despite the report, they are in line for a new $68.5 million contract with the MTA. (Jose Martinex for The City) City Councilmember Brad Lander and Mayor de Blasio are worried that no one will continue their fight to rezone Gowanus if the work isn't done before they both leave office. Maybe that's a sign that it isn't a good idea? (Eddie Small for The Real Deal) Will the late summer and fall resemble a bustling springtime market when it comes to real estate in the city? The plan to reopen the city's real-estate industry. (Caroline Spivack for Curbed) The MTA has deemed its disinfecting UV light pilot program a success and is expanding it. Last month, a doctor working at Columbia University demonstrated the first-ever UV light that killed the virus on the subway. (Nicholas Loud for Untapped New York) The mayor has tested negative for Covid-19. (Kathleen Culliton for Patch) Lincoln Center is honoring Pride by lighting its fountains and columns with a rainbow light installation. (Mike Mishkin for I Love the Upper West Side) Prestigious all-girls schools, including Spence, Brearley, and Chapin, have been rocked by allegations of racism made by generations of black graduates on Instagram. (Eliza Shapiro for NY Times) Ippudo will allow takeout for the first time in 12 years. (Erika Adams for Eater) Photos: "A Love Letter to New York," an art installation that has placed elaborate floral arrangements across the city. (Howard Halle for Time Out) Where to find red velvet cake ahead of Juneteenth. (Kristen Adaway For Thrillist) Thanks to reader Lisa for today's featured photo!